Children need sedation for painful or scary procedures

April 14, 2011  |  General

When I started training in pediatrics nearly 35 years ago it was common practice when an infant or child needed something done that was going to be painful, anxiety-producing, or both, the child was often merely held (or tied) down. Looking back on it now, it reminds me of the 19th century, a time when somebody might just be given a stick to bite down on. I wonder how we could have been in the same place with children a century later.

To be fair, there were several reasons we did things that way. Chief among them was the notion — one we now know to be false — that children (infants in particular) did not feel pain in the same way as older persons. The other reason was that we simply didn’t have available many of the medications we have now to counteract pain and anxiety, and the few that we had had not been studied much in children.

Things are much different now. We have a menu of things we can use to prevent pain, ranging from numbing cream we can put on the skin to lessen (or even eliminate) the pain of a needle stick to powerful, short-acting anesthetic drugs we can use to put the child into a deep (and brief) slumber. We have reliable ways of greatly reducing or eliminating both pain and anxiety when a child needs medical procedures as varied as an MRI scan or some stitches in the scalp.

Most doctors who do these procedures are well aware of these things. But if you run across one who doesn’t seem to be, don’t be shy about speaking up and asking what can be done to make your child more comfortable.

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